The Epicenter: Katherine Taylor in Conversation with Frances Dinkelspiel

Co-presented by Nosh and Green Apple Books

Litquake is proud to present the San Francisco launch of Katherine Taylor's newest novel, Valley Fever. With all the sharp-tongued wit of her first novel, Rules for Saying Goodbye, Taylor examines high-class, small-town life among the grapes—on the vine or soaked in vodka—in Valley Fever, a blisteringly funny, ferociously intelligent, and deeply moving novel of self-discovery, set in California's wine-soaked Central Valley. In conversation with Berkeleyside editor Frances Dinkelspiel, author of the upcoming book Tangled Vines: Greed, Murder, Obsession, and an Arsonist in the Vineyards of California. Book sales and signing to follow.

“In Katherine Taylor’s stirring and sneakily capacious novel, what begins as a family romance widens out to be nothing less than a portrait of the knotty, complicated relationship between land and the people who make it their life’s work to nurture and sometimes exploit it.  Heartbreak comes in the form of relentless heat, ravaging dust, and a perfect grape left to wither on the vine, and the undoing of a once proud family vineyard becomes as potent a tale of love and betrayal as any I’ve recently read. Taylor’s prose is sharp, rueful, hilarious and crackling with life. Her characters’ raw, unsentimental affairs with one another and with the earth they till will stay with you long after you’ve left the book’s pages behind.”—Marisa Silver, author of Mary Coin

Ingrid Palamede never returns to places she’s lived in the past. For her, “whole neighborhoods, whole cities, can be ruined by the reasons you left.” But when a breakup leaves her heartbroken and homeless, she’s forced to return to her childhood home of Fresno, California. Back in the real wine country, where grapes are grown for mass producers like Gallo and Kendall-Jackson, Ingrid must confront her aging parents and their financial woes, soured friendships, and blissfully bad decisions. But along the way, she rediscovers her love for the land, her talent for harvesting grapes, and a deep fondness and forgiveness for the very first place she ever left.